Binaytara
Foundation aims to
create OncoBlast

A serious game that provides healthcare providers, including oncologists, surgeons, urologists, radiologists, primary care providers, nurses, and pharmacists, education on the use of PARP-inhibitor (PARPi) combination treatments for prostate cancer.

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Overview

Binaytara Foundation aims to create OncoBlast, a serious game that provides healthcare providers, including oncologists, surgeons, urologists, radiologists, primary care providers, nurses, and pharmacists, education on the use of PARP-inhibitor (PARPi) combination treatments for prostate cancer. OncoBlast is a quiz and patient simulator-based game in which players will be presented information from real case studies; they will answer questions from the perspective of other providers and eventually identify the treatment plan and outcome of each study.

Educational Games

There is a need for stimulating and impactful teaching methods that serious games can fill. Serious games are games designed for a specific purpose such as CME. Serious games apply the principles of gamification–the application of game elements such as rewarding with badges or points outside of a game setting [e].

Serious games/gamification promote active learning and allows the user to gain experience in a risk-free environment. In fact, using serious games during and/or before MTBs would create more interesting and engaging conversations [e]. Currently, there are no serious games designed for the field of oncology. There is a need for active learning tools in CME that serious games and VMTBs can fulfill.

The Need for Education

Needs Assessment In 2020, Cancer was the second leading cause of death, after heart disease in the United States. There were 602,350 cancer deaths; 284,619 were among females and 317,731 among males. Lung cancer was the leading cause of cancer death, accounting for 23% of all cancer death according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Despite advancements in treatments and cures, cancer has lower survival rates in low-resource settings, including rural communities in America and low-income countries [6]. The disparities in survival rates globally can be attributed to the stage of disease presentation, healthcare infrastructure, and available treatments [7].

Underdeveloped healthcare settings are less likely to have access to cancer screening and oncology care due to poor spatial access to care and inactive surveillance systems; this results in fewer early detected cases. Furthermore, many rural residents live in areas with a healthcare provider shortage, resulting in a lack of specialists and increasing distances to treatment centers [8, 9]. This results in a shifted focus on understanding the available treatments to offer personalized and resource-fitting solutions to patients. It has been cited by The American Society of Clinical Oncology that 70% of rural counties in the US do not have medical oncologists, which increases cancer mortality [9].

Consequently

Consequently, primary care physicians need to be well-equipped to find early signs of the disease and remain up-to-date with treatment advancements. Although it is challenging to recruit specialists to rural areas, it may be easier to foster collaborative partnerships between urban centers and rural providers for specialty care. One way of facilitating this is through continuing medical education (CME) programs. CME facilitates lifelong learning by focusing on maintaining or developing knowledge, skills, and relationships that ensure component practice [a]. This experience can be delivered through conferences, formal sources, workshops, and symposiums. However, CME can be tedious because copious amounts of new medical data and literature are continuously released, varying in quality and accessibility; this is especially true in the field of oncology [b]. Providers are busy and have limited time to consult this information [b, 1-3]. Multidisciplinary tumor boards (MTB) support CME and bring together specialists, primary care physicians, and other healthcare providers for short, focused discussions on patient case studies and/or current literature [10]. MTBs are especially beneficial for physicians in low-resource or rural settings where radiation oncologists may be filling the gap for medical oncologists, alongside their responsibilities; they can be conducted virtually to expand accessibility.

Consequently

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